Monday, March 30, 2020

NUPGE to host online concert April 2

The stress of overwork or isolation due to the COVID-19 is testing many of us. One way people have been reaching out for comfort and connection (virtually, of course) has been through music. As trade unionists, songs of solidarity and protest are part of our history. They remain important to our movement today.
Artist community hit hard by COVID-19
One of the sectors that has been hard hit through this worldwide epidemic is the entertainment industry. Artists are doing their part do flatten the curve and stop the spread of the coronavirus by canceling performances and concerts. Big name acts can likely weather the temporary loss of one revenue stream, but the loss of tours are a devastating blow to venue staff, technicians, and touring companies.
Artists that aren't backed by a major label are also suffering a huge loss of touring revenue. They rely on their tours to bring in money to feed themselves, their families and fund their future work. The National Arts Centre has started an initiative call #CanadaPerforms where it is providing $1,000 to artists to perform free online concerts via the NAC Facebook page. There are many artists around the world performing concerts from their living rooms for free or to raise money for charities or artist funds.
NUPGE hosts online concert
The National Union of Public and General Employees – of which the New Brunswick Union is a member – are joining the call to help artists share their music and bringing a little tight to our days.
On Thursday, April 2, at 9 p.m. ADT, NUPGE is pleased to host singer-songwriter David Rovics on its Facebook page. David is an activist performer who uses his song to raise awareness and support for anti-globalization, peace, and social justice movements. In August 2018, David was able to join NUPGE members at the annual Leadership School to perform several protest and union songs.
"The artists’ community is a strong and vibrant one, but their lives are based on precarious work," said Larry Brown, NUPGE President. "We want to do our part to engage with artists during this difficult period, to support the industry and their work, but also to bring some great music into our lives."
"At times like these, we need to do whatever we can to care for each other and ourselves, physically, emotionally and mentally. We hope this evening brings some well-earned relaxation to many," said NBU President Susie Proulx-Daigle.